GSES standard
About all the pillars

All the GSES pillars are structured based on the ISO High Level Structure and the Plan, Do, Check, Act philosophy.

On the platform GSES System, two different assessments can be found: one suited for small and medium sized companies (SMEs – companies with max. 100 fte in the Benelux and max 1000 fte in the rest of Europe) and one for corporates. Both contain the same core metrics, but the Corporate Assessment also assesses if the organization has conducted an analysis of Context (internal and external issues in relation to CSR), Stakeholders, Risk and opportunities and Leadership. For SMEs, these topics are also important, but they often lack the resources to do analyses on them. Therefore, SME Scan focusses on the Plan, Do, Check, Act part of the High Level Structure.

Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR)

 

 

 1.  The GSES Corporate Social Responsibility Pillar

 

The GSES CSR pillar is based on the international guideline for Social Responsibility of Organizations: ISO 26000:2011.

Corporate Social Responsibility is strategic in nature. It relates to both business operations and business processes and has an impact on the supply chain and society. As defined by ISO 26000, CSR is the responsibility of an organization for the impact of its decisions and activities on society and the environment through transparent and ethical behaviour that:

  • Contributes to sustainable development, including health and the well-being of society;
  • Takes into account the expectations of stakeholders;
  • Is in accordance with applicable laws and international standards of conduct;
  • Is integrated throughout the organization and is put into practice in its relations

These four characteristics of CSR are all focused on action and assurance. Recognizing, acknowledging and providing insight into CSR performance is an important first step in the growth towards being a sustainable organization.

The CSR Pillar is the most encompassing of all the pillars, it is looks at an orgs generic approach to sustainability. Due to the integral approach of CSR within GSE-Standard CSR Pillar, it is possible to contribute to all 17 United Nations goals for sustainable development.

 

2.  CSR Pillar content

 

Context Analysis

 

Companies and governments are all part of a larger whole. No organization stands alone. There are always customers or members, suppliers and stakeholders. Within the CSR Pillar the context analysis of mapping the environment is the first step. A distinction is made between:

  • internal issues
  • external issues, related to the surrounding socio-economical system
  • external issues, related to the value chain

Internal issues are focused on the organization itself. It’s about concepts as corporate culture (openness/transparency, ethics etc.), business resources (real estate, resources, energy consumption, waste, recycling etc.) and employees (internal versus freelance employees, working conditions, equality between men and women, development, training, recruitment etc.).

External issues have to do with the environment of the organization. For example:

  • the value chain (e.g. industry agreements, covenants such as Green Deals, ICSR covenant etc.), government (e.g. laws and regulations, zoning plans etc.),
  • civil society organizations (NGOs e.g. regarding human rights, animal welfare, nature etc.),
  • market-/sector developments (e.g. from fossil to biobased, robot technology etc.),
  • public opinion and media (e.g. driver bonuses), and local communities (e.g. safety, employment, nuisance).

The physical environment of the organization also plays a role when it comes to external issues. For example, the effects of an organization on infrastructure, surrounding companies or citizens, nature and the environment and safety.

 

Stakeholders

 

One general CSR principle is to respect the interests of stakeholders. In fact, stakeholders play a central role when it comes to the social responsibility of the organization. They are the persons or organizations that have an interest in the decisions and activities of the organization. An organization should identify its stakeholders and be accessible so new stakeholders can also register.

 

Risk and Opportunity Analysis

 

Organizations should manage their sustainability risks and opportunities. The objective of risk management in the context of CSR is to identify the internal and external risks and opportunities related to the activities of the organization. It aims to create priorities and to manage these risks and opportunities.

This applies not only to the risks and opportunities for the organization itself, but also for the risks and opportunities for society, local environment, economic system, and natural environment. It further includes if stakeholders in the value chain and beyond are able to meet the CSR requirements of laws and regulations, international standards of conduct, industry association agreements and the objectives of the own organization.

 

Leadership

 

The Pillar checks if management is committed and shows leadership with regard to CSR.

 

Planning – Policy, Strategy and CSR

 

It is crucial that CSR is integrated into the management of the organization. An organization has a policy, whether global or detailed, and perhaps also a strategy. What ambitions and goals does the organization pursue with regard to sustainability?

Implementing CSR in the organization is ultimately about integrating CSR into policy, strategy and objectives. This should lead to the inclusion of CSR objectives in, for example, annual plans, department plans, project plans or innovative pilots. This does not alter the fact that some organizations consider it useful – as an intermediate step – to formulate a separate CSR policy first.

The CSR pillar looks at the CSR policy, materiality analysis (what is most relevant in terms of impact) and SMART targets. Next it checks if the policy covers:

  • involving the stakeholders
  • continuously improving sustainability
  • innovation
  • life-cycle approach.

 

Communication and CSR

 

Openness and transparency are very important in CSR. That is why communication plays a major role. Communicating about CSR makes it easier to involve stakeholders and engage in dialogue with them.

In particular, it can be said that communication on sustainable aspects, needs and performance is best integrated into regular contacts with stakeholders.

 

Planning & The Seven CSR Core Subjects

 

ISO 26000 has ordered CSR into seven interrelated core subjects:

  • Management of the organization (governance)
  • Human rights
  • Working conditions/labour practices
  • The environment
  • Fair operating practices
  • Consumer issues
  • Involvement with and community development

In the CSR assessment it is checked which of these subjects are addressed in the company policy.

 

Support and implementation

 

The CSR pillar checks if CSR is implemented and supported in various ways e.g. via action plans, management systems, certificates, training and education of employees, and clearly defining CSR responsibilities.

 

Operation

 

For operational aspects, this pillar looks at human rights, environmental impact that is not covered by the other pillars (pollution and water systems), fair business practice, corruption prevention and transparency.

 

Evaluation and improvement

 

The GSES system checks if performance is measured, monitored and assessed with quantitative targets, if this assessment is audited and if the organization draws conclusions from the assessment and works towards continuous improvement.

Circular Economy (CE)

 

 

1.  The GSES CE Pillar

 

In absence of an international ISO standard for Circular Economy, the Circular Economy pillar of GSE Standard is based on the BS 8001:2017 ‘Framework for implementing the principles of the circular economy in organizations – Guide, British Standards Institution (BSI), 2017’.

BS 8001:2017 distinguishes six principles of the circular economy that are important for the organization:

  1. System thinking: applying a holistic approach to understanding how individual decisions and activities interact within the broader system of which they are part.
  2. Innovation: continuous innovation to create value by enabling sustainable management of resources through the design of processes, products/services and business models.
  3. Stewardship: managing the direct and indirect effects of the decisions and activities within the broader system, of which one is part.
  4. Cooperation: internal and external cooperation through (in)formal arrangements to create shared value.
  5. Value optimization: to keep all products, components and materials at their highest value and use at all times.
  6. Transparency: being open about decisions and activities that affect the ability to transition to a more circular and sustainable state of operation and being willing to communicate these in a clear, accurate, time-bound, fair and complete manner.

Much pioneering work in framing the concept of Circular Economy has been done by the Ellen MacArthur Foundation. The CE Pillar is, next to the BS8001, also based on the work of the Ellen MacArthur Foundation.

The pillar Circular Economy of GSE Standard is closely connected to the Circular Footprint pillar. To get a good grip of the level of circularity of an organization and its supply chain, the project/project-level of the Circular Footprint pillar can be connected to the organizational level of the Circular Economy pillar. Together they give the complete overview of the level of circularity.

The Circular Footprint pillar of GSE-Standard is based on the method ‘Circular Indicators – An Approach to Measuring Circularity’ of the Ellen MacArthur Foundation and the ‘Material Reutilization’ of Cradle to Cradle and goes a step further. It takes scalability, production of waste, recycle content and biobased raw material flows into account. The Circular Footprint pillar is applicable to projects, products, ships and buildings.

By working on the Circular Economy Pillar (and the Circular Footprint Pillar on the product/project-level) of GSE-Standard, the organization can contribute to the realization of the following SDGs: 6, 9, 11, 12 and 17.

 

2.  CE Pillar content

 

Context Analysis

 

The CE Pillar checks context analysis in the same way as the other pillars. Issues (both internal and external) related to procurement and the value chain need to be analysed.

 

Stakeholders

 

When it comes to CE the organization deals with a large number of stakeholders e.g.:

  • Suppliers, contractors, intermediaries, partners
  • Distributors, customers
  • Sector and branches
  • Governments (laws and regulations and enforcement)
  • Citizens and local communities
  • NGOs
  • Politics

 

Risk and opportunities

 

After the context and stakeholder analysis, CE specific risks and opportunities should be addressed e.g.:

  • options for creating a system around a product service in which the value of materials is retained as much as possible, and partners needed for this
  • techniques and/or innovations

 

Leadership

 

The Pillar checks if management is committed and shows leadership with regard to CE.

 

Planning & CE Subjects

 

The CE Pillar check if and organization has policies and objectives for Circular Economy, if concrete targets have been set for CE and if KPIs have been established in order to manage the CE objectives.

The Pillar checks 7 aspects of CE planning:

  1. system thinking, and long term thinking in the direction of system change
  2. collaboration in the chain focused on circularity
  3. innovation and redesign of products and/or services
  4. new business models focused on value retention
  5. taking responsibility for the life cycle of materials
  6. high-quality reuse and recycling of products and materials
  7. renewable materials

 

Support

 

Aspects of implementing and supporting CE In the organization in the pillar are:

  • a practical action plan for CE that is regularly reviewed and updated
  • a CE management system
  • training and education of employees in CE management and tooling
  • management supports the organization and encourages them to persevere and come up with new ideas if the results are disappointing
  • the organization is already active in one or more pilots so as to experiment with CE

 

Operation

 

Operational checkpoints are cooperation, waste separation and recycling. But also procurement practice is important, specifically financial flexibility for the use of a total cost of usage/ownership calculation and spending money over a longer period of time instead of all at once.

 

Looking at what an organization actually does or offers their clients the Pillar includes:

  • modular and/or easy to repair products
  • use bio-based materials from sustainably managed areas that do not compete with food production
  • use recycled substances and materials in products
  • apply high-quality reused parts in products (re-manufacture)
  • supply high-quality reused products (refurbish)
  • applying pay per use, lease and/or buy back contracts
  • assuring the recycling of materials after use
  • assuring the reuse of products and/or parts after use

The Circular Economy Pillar includes two methods for quantifying circularity based on material flows on the organizational level: Circular Revenue and Water Circularity, according to the WBCSD CTI Framework, and Circulytics, respectively. For example, the assessment ask for the percentage of the Circular Revenue for the company or business unit assessed.

 

Evaluation and improvement

 

The GSES system checks if performance is measured, monitored and assessed with quantitative targets, if this assessment is audited and if the organization draws conclusions from the assessment and works towards continuous improvement.

CO2

 

 

1.  The GSES CO2 Pillar

 

The CO2 pillar of GSE-Standard is for the most part based on ISO 14064-1:2019 and ISO 50001:2018. The GSES CO2 pillar standard further contains specific requirements for reporting and verification of the organization’s greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and CO2 offset/compensation.

Each organization is responsible for a certain amount of greenhouse gas emissions (either direct or indirect). What organizations can do is:

  1. Minimizing their own GHG emissions (using less fossil fuel, increase share of sustainable electricity),
  2. Compensation of CO2 (e.g. via planting of trees)
  3. Prepare for a changing climate (adaptation).

By working on the CO2 Pillar of the GSE-Standard, an organization can contribute to the realization of the following SDGs: 7, 13 and 17.

 

2. CO2 Pillar content

 

Context Analysis, Stakeholders, Risk and opportunities

The CO2 Pillar checks context analysis in the same way as the other pillars:

  • Issues (both internal and external) related to CO2 and the value chain need to be analysed.
  • The organization should identify the stakeholders who are directly or indirectly involved.
  • After the context and stakeholder analysis, CO2 specific risks and opportunities should be addressed

 

Leadership

 

The Pillar checks if management is committed and shows leadership with regard to CO2.

 

Planning

 

According to this standard, a company’s policy must include:

  • policies for climate and reducing greenhouse gas emissions (CO2, methane, nitrous oxide, etc.).
  • involving employees in their greenhouse gas policy
  • as a plan to eventually do as much as possible in a CO2-neutral way
  • quantitative targets against which actions and results in terms of the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions will be assessed
  • communicating with their suppliers and customers about greenhouse gas and climate emissions

 

Support

 

To support choosing the actions with the most impact, insight is required. Starting with a scope analysis enables the organization to map its current ‘greenhouse gas footprint’. The emission flows can be divided into three different scopes:

  1. Scope 1: these are direct emissions; emissions as a result of activities within the organization itself. This includes diesel generators, fuel consumption such as petrol, diesel and gas, heating installations, but also coolant in cooling equipment.
  2. Scope 2: these are indirect emissions; the emissions are generated elsewhere. Examples of this are purchased electricity consumption, air travel or fuel consumption of rental cars.
  3. Scope 3: this concerns indirect emissions that are generated in the supply chain.

The CO2 Pillar asks about which scopes have been including and if CO2 management is implemented and supported by:

  • a practical action plan for CO2 that is regularly reviewed and updated;
  • a CO2 management system and;
  • training and education of employees in CO2 management and tooling.

 

Operation

 

Looking at what an organization actually achieves, the CO2 Pillar asks about:

  • Reduction of the CO2 emissions from their building(s), and – if applicable – site(s)/factories, fleet and vehicle fleet.
  • Use of renewable energy produced from wind or sun, produced by themselves or purchased with guarantees of domestic origin.
  • The proportion of CO2 emissions from energy use, mobility and transport that is compensated for and a plan to maximize the compensation of CO2 emissions in scope 1, 2 and 3
  • Energy-neutrality and energy-generating = 20 points
  • Encouragement of parties in their value chain to reduce CO2 emissions

 

Evaluation and improvement

 

The GSES system checks if performance is measured, monitored and assessed with quantitative targets, if this assessment is audited and if the organization draws conclusions from the assessment and works towards continuous improvement.

Sustainable Procurement (SP)

 

 

1.  The GSES Sustainable Procurement Pillar

 

The Sustainable Procurement (SP) or Socially Responsible Procurement (SRP) pillar from GSE Standard is based is based on the ISO 20400. SP is a theme that plays a prominent role in organizations that develop and implement a sustainable strategy.

The ISO 20400 guideline offers a practical and highly professional approach to help achieve a sustainable strategy on the one hand and to make supply chains more sustainable on the other. In ISO 20400 ‘Sustainable Procurement’ is defined as ‘purchasing with the most positive environmental, social and economic effects, that are possible throughout the entire life cycle.’

When it to comes to SP, purchasing involves the sustainability aspects associated with the goods and services and with suppliers in the supply chain. SP contributes to achieving organizations’ sustainability goals and objectives and sustainable development in general. Sustainable Procurement is a powerful tool for all organizations that wish to behave responsibly and contribute to sustainable development and achieving the all of the 17 SDGs.

By integrating sustainability into procurement policies and practices, including supply chains, organizations can manage risks and opportunities for environmental, social and economic development.

 

2.  SP Pillar content

 

Context Analysis

 

The SP Pillar checks context analysis in the same way as the CSR pillar. Issues (both internal and external) related to procurement and the value chain need to be analysed.

 

Stakeholders

 

When it comes to Sustainable Procurement the organization deals with a large number of stakeholders connected to supply chains. Examples are:

  • Suppliers, contractors, intermediaries, partners
  • Distributors, customers
  • Sector and branches
  • Governments (laws and regulations and enforcement)
  • Citizens and local communities
  • NGOs
  • Politics

The organization should identify the stakeholders who are directly or indirectly involved in purchasing activities.

 

Risk and opportunities

 

After the context and stakeholder analysis, SP specific risks and opportunities should be addressed

 

Leadership

 

The Pillar checks if management is committed and shows leadership with regard to SP.

 

Planning & SP Subjects

 

The SP pillar checks if, addition to the seven CSR principles of ISO 26000, the SP principles of ISO 20400 are mentioned in policy plans. These are:

  • involving stakeholders in the policy on SP
  • continuously improving the sustainability of procurement
  • the sustainability and/or circularity of the 1st tier suppliers
  • communicating about sustainability, SP and/or circular economy with suppliers and customers
  • adherence to SP principles like accountability, transparency and fairness
  • adherence to SP principles like a focus on needs, innovation and life cycle costing

 

Support and implementation

 

These topics are addressed in the same way as the CSR pillar: action plans, management systems, certificates, training and education of employees, and clearly defining CSR responsibilities, providing tools.

 

Operation

 

For operational aspects, this pillar looks at human rights, environmental impact that is not covered by the other pillars e.g. pollution and water systems, and fair business practice corruption prevention and transparency. This also similar to the CSR Pillar, but the SP pillar focusses on how the organization implements this in dealing with suppliers and the supply chain.

 

Evaluation and improvement

 

The GSES system checks if performance is measured, monitored and assessed with quantitative targets, if this assessment is audited and if the organization draws conclusions from the assessment and works towards continuous improvement.

Health and Safety (HS)

 

 

1. The Health & Safety Pillar

 

The GSE-Standard Health & Safety (HS) pillar is based on the international standard ISO 45001:2018 ‘Occupational health and safety management systems – Requirements with guidance for use’.

An organization is responsible for creating safe and healthy working conditions for its employees – and for others who may be affected by a company’s activities. This responsibility includes promoting and protecting physical and mental health.

The introduction of a management system for safe and healthy working conditions aims to prevent work-related injuries and health problems and continuously improve its Health & Safety performance.

The Health & Safety pillar of GSE-Standard also integrates aspects of health and safety as employee welfare. The pillar does not address topics such as product safety, material damage or environmental impact – aside from the health and safety risks these topics might expose employees and relevant stakeholders to.

By working on the Health & Safety Pillar of GSE-Standard, the organization can contribute to the realization of the following SDGs: 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 17.

 

2. Health & Safety Pillar content

 

Context Analysis

 

The H&S Pillar checks context analysis in the same way as the other pillars:

  • Issues (both internal and external) related to H&S and the value chain need to be analysed.
  • The organization should identify the stakeholders who are directly or indirectly involved.
  • After the context and stakeholder analysis, H&S specific risks and opportunities should be addressed

 

Examples of external issues for HS include:

  • the cultural, social, political, legal, financial, technological, economic and natural environment;
  • the market competition, whether international, national, regional or local;
  • the introduction of new (sub)contractors, suppliers, partners and providers and of new technologies, legislation and professions;
  • the introduction of new knowledge of products and their impact on health and safety.

 

Examples of internal issues for HS include:

  • the introduction of new products, materials, services, tools, software, spaces and equipment;
  • the culture in the organization;
  • the form and scope of contractual relationships, including outsourced activities;
  • (changing) working time arrangements and working conditions;

 

Stakeholders

 

The organization is advised to set up, implement and maintain a Health & Safety system for consultation and participation of employees at all applicable levels and in all applicable functions. This system must also involve employee representatives in the phases of development, planning, implementation, evaluation performance, and improvement process of the (management) system.

Employee consultation implies two-way communication that involves dialogue and exchange. Consultation involves providing the information necessary for employees in a timely manner. It is recognized that providing free training for employees and training during working hours can, where possible, remove important barriers to employee participation.

In addition to consulting employees, the following stakeholders may be relevant to consult in the Health & Safety system:

  • Legislative and regulatory authorities (local, regional, state/provincial, national or international);
  • Parent organizations;
  • Suppliers, contractors and subcontractors;
  • Employee- and employers organizations/unions;
  • Owners, shareholders, clients, visitors, the local community and general public;
  • Customers, medical and other community services, media, science, business associations and NGOs;
  • Health and safety organizations and healthcare professionals.

 

Risk and opportunities

 

The organization has made an inventory of the H&S risks and opportunities (E.g. on aspects such as: physical, chemical, biological, psychosocial, mechanical, electrical, movement, energy) for:

  • employees
  • subcontractors
  • temporary workers
  • apprentices
  • other internals who are involved
  • the environment

 

Leadership

 

The management must demonstrate leadership and involvement with regard to the Health & Safety (management) system for consultation and participation by:

  • Taking overall responsibility and declaring themselves fully accountable for the prevention of work-related injuries and health problems, as well as providing safe and healthy workplaces and activities.
  • Ensuring that the responsibilities and powers for relevant roles within a Health & Safety (management) system are assigned and are communicated at all levels of the organization.

 

Planning

 

According to this standard, a company’s policy must include policies and objectives for H&S, and:

  • a H&S management system
  • concrete targets for H&S
  • H&S performance indicators (KPIs), in order to manage the H&S SMART objectives

 

Support

 

In the H&S Pillar, checkpoints related to support for carrying out the H&S policy are:

  • mechanisms, time, training and resources for employee consultation and participation
  • offering employees timely access to clear, comprehensible, relevant information about H&S
  • consulting non-managerial employees when establishing the H&S policy
  • obstacles and barriers to employee participation are identified, removed or minimised
  • non-managerial employees are involved in establishing competence requirements, training needs, training and evaluating training
  • offering timely access to clear, comprehensible and relevant information about H&S to the other stakeholders

 

Next to consulting and involving employees in a structured manner, organizations are checked concerning their inventory of:

  • the information on tools, machines, systems that can promote safety
  • potential emergency situations (unplanned or unscheduled situations) that require an immediate response
  • opportunities for improving H&S-related performance for employees, contractors, temporary employees and other internal stakeholders
  • opportunities for improving H&S-related performance for the environment
  • legal and other requirements applicable to its hazards and H&S risks (including opportunities)

 

Furthermore, support for H&S consists of:

  • Clear responsibilities and competencies for relevant roles within a H&S management system
  • specific H&S-related tools in order to better integrate H&S in processes and projects.

 

Operation

 

For H&S in the operation, this pillar looks at fostering awareness and support among employees with regard to H&S and regular communication about H&S with external parties.

The pillar also looks at proactively dealing with H&S hazards through:

  • constantly identifying (new) H&S hazards
  • focusing on hazards related to social factors
  • design control measures or reorganization of work to eliminate hazards
  • provision of free personal protective equipment (PPE) and instructions for the use and maintenance of the PPE
  • contingency plans and training for emergency situations
  • periodic exercises and/or tests to simulate potential emergency situations

 

Evaluation and improvement

 

The GSES system checks if performance is measured, monitored and assessed with quantitative targets, if this assessment is audited and if the organization draws conclusions from the assessment and works towards continuous improvement.

Biodiversity (BIO)

 

 

1. Biodiversity Pillar

 

The GSE-Standard for Bio-Diversity is based on the UN Guidance Note on Standard 1: Biodiversity Conservation and Sustainable Natural Resource Management. As yet, there are no internationally accepted certifiable standards available for managing biodiversity on the organizational level, comparable to ISO standards.

 

Currently, an ISO standard for biodiversity is being developed. Until its formal publication, the GSE-pillar aligns with the UN standard just mentioned and the ISO High Level Structure.

 

Key topics are:

  • Impact of production of food, fibre and fuel on species and ecosystems
  • Extinction risks and critical habitats (how endangered are species and what are the conditions they rely on)
  • Influencing the supply chain to prevent ecosystem destruction

By working on the Biodiversity Pillar of GSE-Standard, the organization can contribute to the realization of the following SDGs: 2, 6, 12, 13, 14, 15, 17.

 

2. Biodiversity Pillar content

 

Context Analysis, Stakeholders, Risk and opportunities

 

The CO2 Pillar checks context analysis in the same way as the other pillars:

  • Issues (both internal and external) related to CO2 and the value chain need to be analysed.
  • The organization should identify the stakeholders who are directly or indirectly involved.
  • After the context and stakeholder analysis, CO2 specific risks and opportunities should be addressed

 

Leadership

 

The Pillar checks if management is committed and shows leadership with regard to Biodiversity.

 

Planning

 

According to this standard, a company’s policy must include:

  • the relationship between biodiversity and the organization’s vision, mission and strategy
  • global and national biodiversity trends and relevant policy developments
  • concrete goals for improving biodiversity, globally and/or nationally
  • the importance of identifying and involving internal and external stakeholders in the policy and actions for biodiversity
  • the importance of identifying the direct impacts of the organization on biodiversity as well as the indirect impacts via the supply chain and customer base
  • communicating about biodiversity with suppliers and customers

 

Furthermore, the pillar checks if an organization:

  • has made an inventory of, and prevents and limits, the actual and potential adverse effects of the organization on biodiversity:
  • is actively involved in biodiversity action for specific areas in the supply chain (e.g. via biodiversity covenant, Biodiversity Action Plan, Biodiversity Management Plan)

 

Support

 

In the GSE standard, attention is paid to active involvement in biodiversity action for specific geographical areas, the adoption of specific and suitable supporting tools for managing biodiversity and impacts on biodiversity (e.g. education, impact assessment), and to communication about biodiversity with various stakeholders.

 

Operation

 

For operational aspects, organizations are asked to show:

  • the percentage of their turnover created by selling products or services that are demonstrably beneficial for biodiversity,
  • and the degree to which they have implemented conditions relating to biodiversity into contracts with suppliers and supply chain audit effort.
  • other specific measures and projects for improving biodiversity, e.g. . projects to improve biodiversity on the company sites or in the public space.

 

Evaluation and improvement

 

The GSE pillar on biodiversity checks of biodiversity impacts are in fact measured, monitored and assessed with specific, suitable and quantitative targets for:

  • Company sites/terrains, according to the IPC method.
  • Direct company impacts resulting from company processes
  • Impacts in the supply chain

Last but not least, organizations must show that they draw conclusions from the biodiversity assessment and work towards continuous improvement on the basis of the assessment.

 

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